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Asthma Profile in Ohio
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  Asthma Profile in Ohio  
 

Estimated asthma prevalence for Ohio

  • Adult Current Asthma1      8.5 percent

  • Adult Lifetime Asthma2    12.2 percent

  • Child Lifetime Asthma6    13.3 percent

Disparities of asthma rates based on income and race

  • Current asthma prevalence rates for black Ohioans are 50 percent higher than for white residents.1

  • Ohioans making $15,000 or less are almost three times more likely to have current asthma than those making more than $50,000.1

Ohio falls short of meeting the Healthy People (HP) 2010 Goals for asthma

  • Ohio rates for asthma hospitalization, in all age groups, exceed 2010 targets by at least 40 percent.5

  • Emergency department (ED) visits for children under 5 years old are nearly twice the HP 2010 target.5

Seriousness of the problem

Children

  • Children 5 to 17 years of age missed 14.7 million school days due to asthma in 2004.7

  • Of Ohio adults with asthma, 12.9 percent said that they were unable to work or carry out usual activities because of asthma at some time in the past twelve months.6

  • Nearly one-quarter (24.1 percent) of Ohio children with asthma had an emergency department visit in the past 12 months.6

  • From 1999-2003, the age group with the highest hospital discharge rate for patients with a primary diagnosis of asthma was children under 5 years of age.5
  • Children 19 and under accounted for 44 percent of ED visits in Ohio during 2003.5
Adults
  • In 2004, adults 18 years of age and over who were currently employed missed 11.8 million work days due to asthma.4

  • Of Ohio adults with asthma, 12.9 percent said that they were unable to work or carry out usual activities because of asthma at some time in the past 12 months.4

  • Nearly one-quarter (22.4 percent) of adults with asthma report having asthma symptoms at least once a day. More than half (51.6 percent) report asthma made it difficult for them to sleep for at least one night per month. More than one in nine adults with asthma (12 percent) report 10 or more days in the past month where asthma interrupted their sleep.4

  • One in four women with asthma report having symptoms every day in the past four weeks, so they could not lead a normal, active life because of their asthma.4

  • In 2003, females had close to twice the inpatient hospital discharge rate of males with a primary diagnosis of asthma. While the male discharge rate has decreased over the past five years, there was a sharp increase for females from 2002-2003.5

  • From 1999-2003, the age group with the largest increase in the rate of hospital discharge with a primary diagnosis of asthma was adults aged 65 years and older.5

Costs

  • The average cost for an inpatient stay due to a primary diagnosis of asthma increased from $5,692 in 1999 to $8,272 in 2003, a 45.3 percent increase.5

  • In 2003, the average cost of an ED visit was $680, up from $599 in 2002.5

Sources:

1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2004). Prevalence Data Ohio 2004 Asthma: Adults who have been told they currently have asthma.

2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2004). Prevalence Data Ohio 2004 Asthma: Adults who have ever been told they have asthma.

3Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (2006) Asthma Prevalence, Health Care Use and Mortality, 2002.

4Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004.

5Ohio Department of Health (2006). Hospital Discharges for Asthma in Ohio, 1999-2003. Unpublished manuscript.

6Ohio Family Health Survey (2004).

7National Health Interview Survey (2004). National Center for Health Statisitcs, United States Department of Health and Human Services.


 
 
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